Laurie_Screenings

Prevention Guidelines for You

Here are the screening tests and immunizations that most women age 50-64 need. Although you and your healthcare provider may decide that a different schedule is best for you, this plan can guide your discussion. Call 1-855-PMG-TEAM to schedule an appointment with your primary care provider today or find a PMG Clinic near you.  

Screening

 

Who needs it

 

How often

 

Alcohol misuse

 

All adults

 

At routine exams

 

Blood pressure

 

All adults

 

Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends the following screening schedules:

Every 2 years - blood pressure reading < 120/80 mm Hg, and

Yearly - systolic blood pressure reading of 120 to 139 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure of 80 to 89 mm Hg

 

Breast cance

 

 

All women

 

Yearly mammogram and clinical breast exam*

 

Cervical cancer

 

An update to this recommendation is currently in progress and being reviewed by the USPSTF. The recommendation below may contain information that is out of date. Please consult your healthcare provider.

Women who have been sexually active and have a cervix

 

Please discuss with your healthcare provider.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends a pap test every 2 years.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) currently recommends that women ages 30 and older get a pap tests once every 3 years, and women with certain risk factors (or at increased risk) may need more frequent screening.**

 

Chlamydia

 

Women at increased risk for infection

 

At routine exams

 

Colorectal cancer

 

All adults

 

Check with your healthcare provider

Fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy is recommended as screening methods

 

Depression

 

All adults in clinical practices that have staff and systems in place to assure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and follow-up

 

At routine exams

 

Diabetes Mellitus, type 2

 

Adults who are asymptomatic with sustained blood pressure (either treated or untreated) greater than 135/80 mm Hg

 

At routine exams

 

Gonorrhea

 

Sexually active women at increased risk for infection

 

At routine exams

 

HIV

 

Anyone at increased risk for infection

 

At routine exams

 

Lipid Disorders

 

All women age 45 and older at increased risk for coronary artery disease

 

At least every five years

 

Obesity

 

All adults

 

At routine exams

 

Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal Women

 

An update to this recommendation is currently in progress and being reviewed by the USPSTF. The recommendation below may contain information that is out of date. Please discuss with your healthcare provider.

Women at age 60 who are at increased risk for osteoporotic fractures

 

Please consult your healthcare provider

 

Syphilis

 

Anyone at increased risk for infection

 

At routine exams

 

Tuberculosis

 

Anyone at increased risk for infection

 

Check with your healthcare provider

 

Counseling

 

Who needs it

 

How often

 

Aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events

 

At-risk adults

Recommended for women age 55 to 79 years when the potential benefit of a reduction in ischemic strokes outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

 

When risk is identified, and please discuss with your healthcare provider

 

Breast cancer, chemoprevention

 

An update to this recommendation is currently in progress and being reviewed by the USPSTF. The recommendation below may contain information that is out of date. Please discuss with your healthcare provider.

Women with high risk

 

The recommendation below may contain information that is out of date. Please consult your healthcare provider.

When risk is identified

 

BRCA mutation testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility

 

Women with increased risk

 

When risk is identified

 

Diet, behavioral counseling

 

Adults with hyperlipidemia and other known risk factors for cardiovascular and diet-related chronic disease

 

When diagnosed

 

Tobacco use and Tobacco-Caused Disease

 

All adults

 

Every visit

 

Immunization

 

Who needs it

 

How often

 

Tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis (Td/Tdap) booster

 

All adults

 

Td: Every 10 years

Tdap: Substitute a one-time dose of Tdap for a Td booster - Once after age 18

 

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)

 

All adults age 50 to 64 who lack prior infection or documented vaccinations***

 

One dose

 

Chickenpox (varicella)

 

Adults age 50 to 64 and who lack prior infection or documented vaccinations***

 

Two doses. The second dose should be administered 4 to 8 weeks after the first dose.

 

Flu vaccine (seasonal)

 

All adults

 

Yearly during flu season

 

Hepatitis A vaccine

 

People at risk***

 

Two doses

Schedule:

Zero and 6 to 12 months (Havrix), OR

Zero and 6 to 18 months schedule (Vaqta)

 

Hepatitis B vaccine

 

People at risk***

 

Three doses over six months

Second dose should be administered 1 month after the first dose; the third dose should be administered at least 2 months after the second dose (and at least 4 months after the first dose)

 

Meningococcal

 

People at risk***

 

One or more doses

 

Pneumococcal (polysaccharide)

 

People at risk***

 

One or two doses

 

Zoster

 

All women age 60 and older***

 

One dose

 

* Recommendation from the American Cancer Society (ACS). Currently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening every two years for women ages 50 to 74. The ACS recommends yearly screening for all women ages 40 and older. Women should talk with their doctors about their personal risk factors before making a decision about when to start getting mammograms or how often they should get them. The ACS also recommends annual clinical breast exams (CBEs) for women ages 40 and older. The USPSTF, however, believes there is not enough evidence to assess the value of CBEs for women ages 40 and older. Women should talk with their doctors about their personal risk factors and make a decision about whether they should have a CBE.

** According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, women 30 and older who have had three consecutive negative Pap tests may be screened every three years.

*** Exceptions may exist, please consult your healthcare provider

Other guidelines are from the USPSTF

Immunization schedule from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Online Medical Reviewer: Mukamal, Kenneth MD 
Online Medical Reviewer: Oken, Emily MD 
Online Medical Reviewer: Pierce-Smith, Daphne RN, MSN, FNP, CCRC 

Last Review Date: 2/3/2010 

© 2000-2011 Krames StayWell, 780 Township Line Road, Yardley, PA 19067. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions.